Down The Rabbit Hole
Back to Blog
Misinterpretation of the Zombie

The Misinterpretation of the Zombie / La Malinterpretación del Zombie

gothic literature Apr 01, 2021

THE MISINTERPRETATION OF THE ZOMBIE

From all the monsters in Gothic literature, my least favourite one is the zombie. Unlike the vampire, you couldn’t have a conversation with a zombie. They are slow, clumsy and although they seem to lack a real purpose, for some reason they are after your brain. At a romantic level, you would definitely not fall in love with a zombie (apart from Michael Jackson’s version in his song Thriller), they fall apart and their brittle bodies are a metaphor of the fragility of our own selves and a reminder of what is next for us. In this sense, aesthetically, they represent death in its most ugly version; the decay of the body, the rotten falling limbs, the distorted mouths, the black gunk coming out from their internal organs. You get the rest of the picture.

But what is the fascination that still sparks ideas in modern artists and series producers to get us all hooked to endless seasons like The Walking Dead or playing video games like Resident Evil that even served as inspiration for six films with the same name? In his article, The Moral of the Morbid-When is it okay to stare, Eric G Wilson talks about the concept of morbidity to find answers to the instinctive need of looking and contemplating uncomfortable and disagreeable scenes. This so typically human characteristic that we strongly judge and try to repress in our social lives was already addressed by Carl Jung (1875-1961), a Swiss psychiatrist. As the father of what was translated as Analytical Psychology, and founder of the concept of Synchronicity, Jung considered that the morbid in us shouldn’t be “repressed” because of its psychological consequences. So basically, some people are still doing it all wrong. Supressing and hiding the ugly and the uncomfortable is what is socially expected, but is cognitively wrong, because as you have seen in most of my articles, monsters play an important role in our lives. And this is what I would like to analyse next.

I have been immensely and long intrigued with the origins of the zombie and their social role. In this case, and as I always do, the etymology of the word is my starting point in my research because that helps me to develop my arguments chronologically and logically. To my surprise and as we can read in The Oxford English Dictionary the term zombie has its roots in the Voodoo West African religion and makes reference to a snake-god. The cultural contact during the 18th and 19th century due to slavery, produced this word to have evolved and to be known and adapted over time to accommodate European and American beliefs. But how we connect one to the other is a tricky one and would deserve its own article.

What I can do, however, is to tell you about my findings about my life research of death and the fear of dying. One of the reasons that would explain people’s ancient fear of death worldwide has its foundations in Catalepsy, probably one of the main reasons for people to believe their beloved ones were dead when they were really still very much alive. For those of you who are not familiarised with this term, Catalepsy is a “state of muscular rigidity and decreased sensitivity to pain that is often seen as a symptom of physiologically involved psychiatric disorders such as Schizophrenia, Epilepsy or Parkinson’s disease” (AlleyDog.com). There was a time, when medicine wasn’t as advanced as now, so the “allegedly believed dead” were not given enough time to be completely dead or cured of whatever illness they had. This gave birth to taphophobia, the fear of being buried alive. Interestingly enough, and in order to avoid these mistakes, coffins in the 1800s were built with a system of bell ringing or flagging, in case you had been buried alive, hence the idiom saved by the bell. This is for example the case of the Spanish Female poet and writer Carolina Coronado (1820-1921), who died a few times. Her recurrent experience with near death served as inspiration for poems such as Nada resta de ti that reads as follows, and that I have taken the liberty of translating freely:

Nada resta de ti..., te hundió el abismo..., (nothing is left of you…., the abyss drew you)
te tragaron los monstruos de los mares...
(you were eaten by the sea monsters)
No quedan en los fúnebres lugares
(there aren’t funerary places left)
ni los huesos siquiera de ti mismo.
(not even your own bones)

Fácil de comprender, amante Alberto,
(easy to understand, Alberto, my lover)
es que perdieras en el mar la vida,
(is that you would lose your life in the sea)
mas no comprende el alma dolorida
(but cannot the soul in pain)
cómo yo vivo cuando tú ya has muerto.
(how can I live when you are dead)

Darnos la vida a mí y a ti la muerte;
(give life to me and death to you)
darnos a ti la paz y a mí la guerra,
(give peace to you and war to me)
dejarte a ti en el mar y a mí en la tierra
(leave you in the sea and me on earth)
¡es la maldad más grande de la suerte!...
(is the most evil act from luck!...)

Luckily for us, nowadays the zombie is more than just a fearful but slow monster. As per Harvard Medical School professor and psychiatrist Dr. Schlozman, the things we fear the most are the things we should really analyse to understand their message. In her article Diagnosis Zombie: The Science Behind the Undead Apocalypse by Megan Gannon, for the online magazine LiveScience, she shows how Dr. Schlozman uses the zombie metaphor in a very clever way to talk about neurological illnesses: first by getting his students hooked to his explanations and second by giving answers from a physician’s point of view to the ancient monstrous perception of the zombie. For those of you interested in this part of the story I highly recommend you read the full article.

You can see now that obvious connection of the zombie and to extend the vampire myth. Imagine you were buried alive, what would you do? You would indeed try to get out of your box and in that process you would scratch, bang, and scream your lungs out until finally dying. A few years later, your forever resting bed is opened again and all your descendants can see is your remains contorted in agony and your overgrown, scruffy hair and nails, as well as scratches on the box. Now put this scenario in medieval Europe. What is the first thing that your medieval ancestors would have thought of you? That you were that monster that made   kids disappear, caused illnesses and gave them a bad year’s harvest if you were not content for Halloween. As a consequence in some places, fear of the living dead leads to actions such as what we see in recent research, like the one that Robbie Grammer talks about in one of his articles in the online magazine The Cable. After some recent investigation it was found that “some villagers in the 11th to 13th centuries who lived near modern-day Wharram Percy in northern Yorkshire were apparently scared of zombies. So they made sure the dead would stay dead with some extra handiwork, deliberately mutilating the bodies after death”. 

The never ending fear of what we don’t understand has always used the metaphorical costume of the monster, to hide a more disturbing reality. Among which we can also find social behaviours like the ones we are currently living. In apocalyptic situations where the enemy is invisible and deadly, people’s perception of the scary reality turns them into the zombies we all fear. But this, my friend, is an entry for another day.

 

LA MALINTERPRETACIÓN DEL ZOMBIE

De todos los monstruos de la literatura gótica, el que menos me gusta es el zombi. A diferencia del vampiro, no podrías tener una conversación con un zombi. Son lentos, torpes y, aunque parecen carecer de un propósito real, por alguna razón van detrás de tu cerebro. Desde un punto de vista romántico, definitivamente no te enamorarías de un zombi (aparte de la versión de Michael Jackson en su canción Thriller), se desmoronan y sus cuerpos quebradizos son una metáfora de la fragilidad de nosotros mismos y un recordatorio de lo que será nuestro futuro. En este sentido, estéticamente, representan la muerte en su versión más desagradable; la descomposición del cuerpo, las articulaciones podridas que caen, las bocas dislocadas, la mugre negra que sale de sus órganos internos. Ya te imaginas el resto.

Pero, ¿cuál es la fascinación que aún detona ideas en artistas modernos y productores de series para engancharnos a todos en temporadas interminables como The Walking Dead o jugar videojuegos como Resident Evil que incluso sirvieron de inspiración para seis películas con el mismo nombre? En su artículo, The Moral of the Morbid-When is okay to look, Eric G Wilson habla sobre el concepto de morbosidad para encontrar respuestas a la necesidad instintiva de mirar y contemplar escenas incómodas y desagradables. Esta característica tan típicamente humana que juzgamos fuertemente y tratamos de reprimir en nuestra vida social ya fue abordada por Carl Jung (1875-1961), un psiquiatra suizo. Como padre de lo que se tradujo como Psicología Analítica, y fundador del concepto de Sincronicidad, Jung consideraba que lo mórbido en nosotros mismos no debería ser "reprimido" por sus consecuencias psicológicas. Básicamente, algunas personas todavía se siguen equivocando. Suprimir y ocultar lo feo y lo incómodo es lo que se espera de nosotros socialmente, pero es incorrecto a nivel cognitivo, porque como ya habrás visto en la mayoría de mis artículos, los monstruos juegan un papel importante en nuestras vidas. Y esto es lo que me gustaría analizar a continuación.

Me han intrigado muchísimo y durante mucho tiempo los orígenes del zombi y su papel social. En este caso, y como hago siempre, la etimología de la palabra es el punto de partida en mi investigación porque eso me ayuda a desarrollar mis argumentos cronológica y lógicamente. Para mi sorpresa y como podemos leer en The Oxford English Dictionary, el término zombi tiene sus raíces en la religión vudú de África Occidental y hace referencia a un dios-serpiente. El contacto cultural durante los siglos XVIII y XIX debido a la esclavitud, produjo que esta palabra evolucionara y fuera conocida y adaptada con el tiempo para acomodar las creencias europeas y americanas. Pero cómo conectamos uno con el otro es complicado y merecería su propio artículo.

Sin embargo, lo que puedo hacer es contarte mis descubrimientos sobre mis investigaciones  sobre la muerte y el miedo a morir. Una de las razones que explicaría el antiguo miedo de la gente a la muerte en todo el mundo tiene sus fundamentos en la catalepsia, probablemente una de las principales razones por las que las personas creían que sus seres queridos estaban muertos cuando en realidad todavía estaban muy vivos. Para aquellos que no están familiarizados con este término, la catalepsia es un "estado de rigidez muscular y disminución de la sensibilidad al dolor que a menudo se ve como un síntoma de trastornos psiquiátricos fisiológicamente involucrados como la esquizofrenia, la epilepsia o la enfermedad de Parkinson" (AlleyDog.com). Hubo un tiempo en que la medicina no estaba tan avanzada como ahora, por lo que a los "supuestamente creídos muertos" no se les daba suficiente tiempo para estar completamente muertos o curados de cualquier enfermedad que tuvieran. Esto dio origen a la tapofobia, el miedo a ser enterrado vivo. Curiosamente, y para evitar estos errores, los ataúdes en el 1800 se construyeron con un sistema de campanilla o bandera, en caso de que te hubieran enterrado vivo, de ahí la expresión idiomática salvado por la campana. Este es, por ejemplo, el caso de la poeta y escritora española Carolina Coronado (1820-1921), quien falleció varias veces. Su experiencia recurrente con la muerte cercana sirvió de inspiración para poemas como Nada resta de ti:

Nada resta de ti ..., te hundió el abismo ...,

te tragaron los monstruos de los mares ...

No quedan en los fúnebres lugares

ni los huesos siquiera de ti mismo.

Fácil de comprender, amante Alberto,

es que perdieras en el mar la vida,

mas no comprende el alma dolorida

cómo yo vivo cuando tú ya has muerto.

 

Darnos la vida a mí y a ti la muerte;

darnos a ti la paz y a mí la guerra,

dejarte a ti en el mar y a mí en la tierra

¡Es la maldad más grande de la suerte! ...

Afortunadamente para nosotros, hoy en día el zombi es más que un monstruo temible pero lento. Según el profesor y psiquiatra de la Escuela de Medicina de Harvard, Dr. Schlozman, las cosas a las que más tememos son las que realmente deberíamos analizar para comprender su mensaje. En su artículo Diagnosis Zombie: The Science Behind the Undead Apocalypse de Megan Gannon, para la revista en línea LiveScience, muestra cómo el Dr. Schlozman utiliza la metáfora zombi de una manera muy inteligente para hablar sobre enfermedades neurológicas: primero enganchando a sus estudiantes a sus explicaciones y, en segundo lugar, dando respuestas desde el punto de vista médico a la antigua percepción monstruosa del zombi. Si estás interesado/a ​​en esta parte de la historia, te recomiendo que leas el artículo completo.

Ahora puedes ver esa conexión obvia del zombi y extenderlo al mito de los vampiros. Imagina que te enterraran vivo, ¿qué harías? De hecho, tratarías de salir de tu caja y en ese proceso rascarías, golpearías y gritarías hasta morir finalmente. Unos años más tarde, tu lecho de descanso para siempre se abre de nuevo y todo lo que tus descendientes pueden ver son tus restos retorcidos por la agonía y tus desmadrados y largos en exceso cabellos y uñas, así como arañazos en la caja. Ahora pon este escenario en la Europa medieval. ¿Qué es lo primero que habrían pensado de ti tus antepasados ​​medievales? Que eras ese monstruo que hacía desaparecer a los niños, les causaba enfermedades y les daba una mala cosecha si no estabas contento en Halloween. Como consecuencia en algunos lugares, el miedo a los muertos vivientes llevaba a acciones como las que vemos en investigaciones recientes y de la que habla Robbie Grammer en uno de sus artículos en la revista online The Cable. Después de una investigación reciente, se descubrió que “algunos aldeanos de los siglos XI al XIII que vivían cerca del actual Wharram Percy en el norte de Yorkshire aparentemente tenían miedo a los zombis. Así que se aseguraron de que los muertos permanecieran muertos tras un extra, mutilando deliberadamente los cuerpos tras de la muerte”.

El miedo eterno a lo que no entendemos siempre ha utilizado el disfraz metafórico del monstruo para ocultar una realidad más inquietante. Entre estos podemos encontrar comportamientos sociales como los que estamos viviendo actualmente. En situaciones apocalípticas donde el enemigo es invisible y mortal, la percepción de la gente sobre la aterradora realidad les convierte en los zombis que todos tememos. Pero esto, “my friend”, es una entrada para otro día.

Stay connected to my blog with news and updates!

¡Estate conectado/a a mi blog y recibe las últimas noticias!